Archive for the New York Staff Category

I’m Grateful to Fundraise for Concern Worldwide

Posted on Thursday, February 27th, 2014 at 10:53 am

by Jordan Rickard, Senior Major Gifts Officer, Concern Worldwide U.S.

Concern Worldwide works in partnership with people in their own communities to develop lasting solutions to extreme poverty in some of the world’s poorest countries. Or in other words, Concern is working towards a world where a person’s hopes can be fulfilled.

Concern Worldwide works in partnership with people in their own communities to develop lasting solutions to extreme poverty in some of the world’s poorest countries.

Years ago I lived in southeastern Africa for six months. I spent time in countries such as Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia. Like many Americans who travel abroad, I confronted firsthand both the devastating impacts of poverty and the resiliency of the people working their way out of it. I learned quickly there are no easy answers to these problems and yet the need for solutions is urgent as poverty is a life and death struggle for so many people in our world.

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Life Lessons in Ethiopia

Posted on Thursday, August 8th, 2013 at 10:51 am

By Amanda Ruckel, Education Officer, Concern Worldwide U.S.

Stachel, Grainne, Jeffrey, Dee, Catherine, Ciara, Chloe at the Concern office in Addis Ababa.

Stachel, Grainne, Jeffrey, Dee, Catherine, Ciara, Chloe at the Concern office in Addis Ababa.

Driving through the mountains of Ethiopia from the capital, Addis Ababa, to the northern region of  Wollo, one cannot help but be impressed by the towering trees, the green, rolling hills, and the cool, crisp mountain air. Prior to traveling to Ethiopia, I had heard it was a beautiful country, but I soon realized pictures and anecdotes couldn’t do justice to the sheer beauty of the country that is known as the birthplace of humanity.

I traveled with two other Concern Worldwide staff members from Dublin and New York, one student and teacher from the United States and four students and two teachers from Ireland. The students who participated were fairly familiar with Concern’s work overseas, as the Irish students had debated development issues over the past year and had won the national Concern debates and the American student, Stachel, is a member of the Global Concerns Classroom (GCC) Club at her school and has served as a student leader for the past two years. Together, we spent six days visiting several different Concern programs and learning more about the rich Ethiopian culture.

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How a Flowery Plant is Fighting Malaria in Tanzania

Posted on Friday, March 15th, 2013 at 11:12 am

By Crystal Wells, Communications Officer, Concern Worldwide U.S.

Hapines is Lovenes’ first daughter and at just three months old, she is already fighting malaria.

Lovenes Joas, 22, sits on the edge of a metal-frame hospital bed, cradling her three-month-old daughter, Hapines Joas, in her arms. As she he tries to comfort her squirming daughter, Lovenes crushes up a soft yellow pill and mixes it with water. She tilts her daughter’s head back to force the syrupy liquid down her throat. Hapines wails, tears streaming down her cheeks, and slowly settles back down to a whimper against her mother’s chest.

Hapines is Lovenes’ first daughter and at just three months old, she is already fighting malaria. Lovenes and Hapines share a bed with another mother and child, Stella Peter, 30, and Nizelesos Peter, 10 months, who is also being treated for malaria. “Malaria is a big problem in my family,” says Stella, raising her voice so that we can hear her above the cries of a dozen or so children. “I am a farmer. Right now I could be farming, but I am here losing time because of malaria. It hurts the health of my kids…Even now [while I am here], my three-year-old at home has malaria, but no one is available to take him to the hospital.”

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Protecting Life Where Death is Everyday Conversation

Posted on Friday, October 5th, 2012 at 9:11 am

By Megan Christensen, Health Officer, Concern Worldwide US

 

I have been lucky to visit many of the countries where Concern Worldwide works. In my travels, I met many people and witnessed many things, some inspiring and some heartbreaking.

My most recent trip to Sierra Leone was no different.

Concern Health Officer, Megan Christensen holding a newborn child, whose mother took the initiative to seek immediate-care at the health facility after being encouraged to do so by her husband, the community and Concern.

Sierra Leone is a country emerging from ten years of civil war and armed conflict. I saw commitment to work from the ground-up to rebuild. The people are positive and hopeful. The government is active and forward-thinking. I was there last February, and in a year and a half, I have seen progress.

This is partly because of an initiative that the government took in 2010 to provide free health care to women and children. Today, more women and children are accessing health care, and more of them are aware of when and how to access it.

However, there are still major challenges. Some clinics still struggle with having a steady stream of supplies, like antibiotics. We still don’t have all the information we need to understand why people are dying and what they are getting sick from. For example, we know that 60 percent of births are happening in birth facilities, in the presence of a trained birth attendant, but that’s only half the picture. Where is the other 40 percent giving birth?  Who is with them?  Why did they not go to a health facility?

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World Humanitarian Day 2009 – New York, US

Posted on Thursday, August 13th, 2009 at 3:46 pm

Since the early days of its founding, the UN has designated days and weeks to draw the world’s attention to critical global issues. The yearly calendar, approved by the General Assembly, has almost 50 UN days listed ranging from the well -known “World AIDS Day” to more unusual ones, such as “International Mother Tongue Day.”

This Wednesday Aug. 19, at a ceremony in the lobby of the UN, a new day will be formally added to the calendar when UN Secretary General Ban Kii Moon launches “World Humanitarian Day.” Read the rest of this entry »

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