Archive for the Rwanda Category

Somber and Hopeful: Commemorating 20 Years since the Genocide

Posted on Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 at 1:04 pm

 

Walk to Remember is an event organized by the youth as a way for Rwandans to recall lives lost during the 1994 genocide as well as to make a commitment: “Step-by-step, never again in Rwanda.”

Walk to Remember is an event organized by the youth as a way for Rwandans to recall lives lost during the 1994 genocide as well as to make a commitment: “Step-by-step, never again in Rwanda.”

By Karen Power, Communications Officer, Concern Worldwide

On April 7, 2014 at noon, following a minute of silence, the official commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide began in Amahoro Stadium with a survivor telling his story to 30,000 listeners, including dignitaries from around the world.

Screams and wails rang out in Rwanda’s largest stadium during the ceremony which included a powerful performance featuring khaki-clad soldiers saving slain Rwandans, as well as remarks from President Kagame and Ban Ki-Moon.

The genocide began after an airplane carrying President Juvenal Habyarimana of the majority Hutus was shot down on April 6, 1994. The killing of minority Tutsis and moderate Hutus by soldiers and Hutu extremists followed over the next 100 days, during which some 800,000 people were killed. The country was devastated.

Read the rest of this entry »

Bookmark and Share

Involving Communities to Keep Children in School

Posted on Friday, April 16th, 2010 at 6:00 am

Ange Kamugisha, Education Liaison Officer, Rwanda

Rachael and Sarah pictured carrying out household chores in 2009 when Concern went to check why they'd dropped out of school. Photo: Rwanda, Concern Worldwide

I cannot imagine the sadness of watching my child grow up without the chance to go to school, learn to read and write, or have opportunities to achieve her potential.

And yet, here in my native Rwanda, each time I meet an out-of-school child, I feel a measure of that sadness.

Lack of access to basic, quality primary education is one of the root causes of extreme poverty, and disproportionately affects girls: the majority of the world’s 72 million out-of-school children are girls. Read the rest of this entry »

Bookmark and Share